Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Mindfulness training in karate

Hello everyone!

We really enjoyed the workshop with everyone last week and hope you all traveled safely home.

With our week of spring break on us, Rob called a special karate training to help the students develop more connection between their mind and their bodies. A big component of the training is the students disciplining their bodies to hold particular moves with good posture in the shoulders and body, as well as work on their breathing. A lot of students (and every other person on the planet) bodies respond to stimulus in a fight or flight mode to protect themselves. This rings especially true of people who have had traumatic events in their life. This fight or flight mode takes over which blocks the brain from really processing what the best choice is for the situation they are a part of. Breathing and controlling the body to relax--even when it wants to "fight" or run away, is the first step in recovering and regaining control over your mind and your body, and ultimately your life.

Most of our students have turned to drugs and alcohol, or other avoiding behaviors to momentarily feel in control of their bodies and ultimately to try and feel more in control of their lives. This special training, and the day-to-day trainings, are large components of the effectual change at CRA.

You will see from the pictures that these students are working hard! This special workshop will last 4-6 hours today. There are breaks for meals, snacks, and of course water, but they will be tired and some will be sore for sure.





One side gets ready to attack and one side gets ready to defend.



Being able to be "attacked" physically and keep your body relaxed enough for your mind to be able to process a defense are critical steps in this process. The repetition of the training helps desensitize the out of control feelings from the attack as well as give each student a chance to practice the defense or try a new defense that may work better.



That is great focus.










With challenge and growth comes a need for explanation and processing.

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